DASH diet

My 6-Week DASH Diet Challenge Begins!

Eli Ben-Yehuda

Written by Eli Ben-Yehuda

On July 29, 2018

Well, this morning begins phase one of the 6-week DASH Diet challenge. My weigh in this morning was 247 lbs with a BMI of 33.77 Obese Category One. All this on a 6-foot tall frame. I do not need to tell you that neither my weight or BMI are healthy.

So with a green light from my physician, I am starting this off with a 3-day water only cleanse. After being on some heavy duty narcotics for 6 months from a knee surgery I feel I want to clean out the system.

Now in following the DASH Diet, I will also be adding 3 additional measures of my own. No salt, no sugar, no oil. Do I expect to lose all the weight I need to in the next 6 weeks? I hope not. Quick weight loss almost assuredly means a quick return. I am expecting to take 1-year to lose 68 pounds. That turns out to be about 1.3 lbs per week, which is a healthy weight loss. My target BMI is 21.

I plan on combining this with 30 minutes of brisk walking every morning with some lite weight training. So that’s the plan. If you should have any suggestions please email me, Eli, at [email protected]

 

exercise

How To Start A Walking Program

Eli Ben-Yehuda

Written by Eli Ben-Yehuda

On July 15, 2018
How To Start A Walking Program

Do you want to start walking and don’t know where to begin? Start off slowly. Walking is one of the easiest, most enjoyable, and most profitable forms of exercise. All you need is a good pair of shoes, comfortable clothing, and desire.

First of all, start out slow and easy. Just walk out the door. For most people this means head out the door, walk for 10 minutes, and walk back. That’s it? Yes, that’s it. Do this every day for a week. If this was easy for you, add five minutes to your walks next week (total walking time 25 minutes). Keep adding 5 minutes until you are walking as long as desired.

If you’re new to walking, start off with slow, short sessions and build your way up gradually. Do not worry at all about speed in the beginning. After you have been walking for several weeks you can slowly start picking up your pace. If you have a medical condition or any health concerns be sure to check with your doctor for advice before you begin a routine.

Watch your posture. Walk tall. Think of elongating your body. Hold your head up and eyes forward. Your shoulders should be down, back and relaxed. Tighten your abdominal muscles and buttocks and fall into a natural stride.

Be sure to drink plenty of water before, during, and after walking. Incorporate a warm up, cool down and stretches into your routine. Start your walk at a slow warm up pace, stop and do a few warm-up/flexibility drills. Then walk for the desired length of time. End your walk with the slower cool down pace and stretch well after your walk. Stretching will make you feel great and assist in injury prevention.

To improve cardiovascular fitness you should walk 3 to 4 days a week, 20 to 30 minutes at a very fast pace. At this pace you are breathing harder but not gasping for air. Warm up and cool down in addition to the time spent at the faster pace.

If you are walking for weight loss you will probably need to a minimum 45 to 60 minutes five days a week at a moderate to brisk pace. Walking faster will burn more calories in the same amount of time. However, do increase both mileage and pace slowly to prevent injury.

 

 

About RESPeRATE – Lower High Blood Pressure Naturally.

RESPeRATE is the only non-drug, FDA-Cleared device for lowering blood pressure naturally. It is clinically proven, doctor recommended and has no side effects.
 
RESPeRATE lowers blood pressure by relaxing constricted blood vessels which cause high blood pressure. RESPeRATE does so by harnessing the therapeutic power of slow-paced breathing with prolonged exhalation in a way that is virtually impossible to achieve on your own. All you have to do is breathe along with RESPeRATE’s guiding tones.
 
Learn More…

exercise

Why Bodybuilding At Age 93 Is A Great Idea.

Eli Ben-Yehuda

Written by Eli Ben-Yehuda

On May 23, 2018

Successful aging requires work, diet and exercise. The huge mental and physical potential of the aged remains unexplored. Bodies can now be rebuilt at any age and a new life started…


 

About RESPeRATE – Lower Blood Pressure Naturally.

RESPeRATE is the only non-drug, FDA-Cleared device for lowering blood pressure naturally. It is clinically proven, doctor recommended and has no side effects.

RESPeRATE lowers blood pressure by relaxing constricted blood vessels which cause high blood pressure. RESPeRATE does so by harnessing the therapeutic power of slow paced breathing with prolonged exhalation in a way that is virtually impossible to achieve on your own. All you have to do is breathe along with RESPeRATE’s guiding tones.

Learn More…

exercise

Naturally Lowering Cholesterol Lowers High Blood Pressure

Eli Ben-Yehuda

Written by Eli Ben-Yehuda

On May 6, 2018

Because high blood pressure puts a strain on your heart, brain and blood vessels, it can increase your risk of developing heart attacks and strokes in the future. Having a raised level of cholesterol in your blood also increases the risk of developing these health problems.

So, if you have both a high blood cholesterol level and high blood pressure, then your risk of heart attack or stroke is much stronger than if you had just one or the other.

What Is Cholesterol?

Cholesterol is a naturally occurring substance made by the liver and required by the body for the proper function of cells, nerves, and hormones.

Cholesterol travels in the lipids (fatty acids) of the bloodstream, also called plaque, can build up in the walls of the arteries decreasing the flow of blood to vital areas of the body. If plaque continues to build long-term it significantly increases the risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

Normally, cholesterol is kept in balance. But, the standard western diet which contains a large number of hydrogenated fats and refined carbohydrates leads to an upset in this balance. The imbalance is manifested in elevated LDL (bad cholesterol) and a low HDL (good cholesterol) which increases our risk of heart attack or stroke. Other causes include inactivity, diabetes, stress, and hypothyroidism.

As most are aware, with visits to their doctor, there are three lipoproteins in our blood that are important to our health, low-density lipoproteins (LDL), high-density lipoproteins (HDL), and triglycerides. LDL is known as the bad cholesterol because it is low in proteins and high in cholesterol.

HDL, on the other hand, is high in proteins and low in cholesterol and therefore known as good cholesterol. Triglycerides are a separate lipid in the bloodstream that provides a way for the body to store excess energy, but if they are high is another warning sign.

What Causes High Cholesterol?

If you have high cholesterol, there’s a good chance it’s your fault. And that’s good news! It means you can do something about it.

Your body naturally produces all the LDL (bad) cholesterol it needs. An unhealthy lifestyle, such as eating unhealthy foods and being physically inactive, causes your body to have more LDL cholesterol in your blood than it needs. This is the cause of high cholesterol for most people.

Check your family historyAdditionally, some people inherit genes from their mother, father or even grandparents that cause them to have too much cholesterol. This is called familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). The severity of FH is related to the duration and degree of LDL cholesterol in the blood. FH is dangerous because it can cause premature atherosclerotic heart disease.

If you have high blood cholesterol, making lifestyle modifications is important to help lower your risk of heart disease. If they don’t lower your risk enough, you may need prescribed medications.

If that sounds bad, consider your options. It’s a lot better to change your lifestyle now, to prevent a heart attack or stroke than to wait until a devastating event changes your life for you. Making minor changes now can help prevent major changes later.

If you have a stroke or heart failure from a serious heart attack, you may never fully recover.

Unhealthy Lifestyle

Unhealthy behaviors are the biggest reason why most people with high cholesterol have it. These behaviors include:

Unhealthy diet

Lack of physical activity

Smoking or exposure to tobacco smoke

Excess weight

How Can I Lower My High Cholesterol Naturally?

1. Avoid Eating Saturated Fats: Both polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids help lower LDL. Most plant-derived oils, including canola, safflower, sunflower, olive, grapeseed, and peanut oils, contain both. Fatty fish (such as salmon, tuna, trout, herring, and mackerel), seeds, nuts, avocados, and soybeans are also great sources.

2. Eat A Rainbow of Fruits An Vegetables: Fruits and vegetables have scads of ingredients that lower cholesterol—including fiber, cholesterol-blocking molecules called sterols and stanols, and eye-appealing pigments. The heart-healthy list spans the color spectrum—leafy greens, yellow squashes, carrots, tomatoes, strawberries, plums, blueberries. As a rule, the richer the hue, the better the food is for you.

3. Avoid Refined Grains and Sugars: Whole grains are another good source of fiber. Instead of refined flour and white rice, try whole-wheat flour and brown or wild rice. Old-fashioned oatmeal is also a good choice, but not the quick-cooking versions, which have had much of the fiber processed out.

And don’t substitute sugar for fat. “It’s one of the worst choices you can make,” McManus warns. Food manufacturers may boost the sugar content of low-fat salad dressings and sauces to add flavor. If you see sugar, corn syrup, or any word ending in “one” near the top of the list of ingredients, choose a higher-fat version without trans fats instead.

4. Take Supplements: Vitamin E is the anti-cholesterol vitamin and a powerful antioxidant nutrient, capable of protecting cholesterol from oxidation. Vitamin E is also thought to be capable of preventing heart disease through its ability to thin the blood.

A supplement called policosanol may also assist in lowering cholesterol, according to several studies. Derived from sugar cane wax and beeswax, policosanol appears to be capable of lowering total cholesterol as well as LDL cholesterol and boosting levels of the helpful HDL cholesterol.

Omega-3 fats can be found in fish oil capsules as well as flaxseed oil if you are vegetarian. Similar to the benefits of including more oily fish in your diet, omega-3 supplements reduce cholesterol by reducing the amount the body produces.

Go Go Herbs: The most exciting development in herbal medicine for high cholesterol comes in the form of Chinese red yeast rice. Made by fermenting red yeast over rice, it is a substance used in Traditional Chinese medicine as a remedy for indigestion and poor circulation and, as scientists have now discovered, for high cholesterol, lowering raised levels of cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood.

It is worthwhile making a green tea rich in cardio-protective antioxidants called catechins and polyphenols – your hot drink of choice. Research shows that drinking green tea on a regular basis raises good HDL cholesterol and lowers total cholesterol by blocking intestinal absorption of cholesterol and stimulating its excretion from the body.

Common kitchen herbs, turmeric, and rosemary, also appear to promote healthy cholesterol levels. Rosemary contains phytochemicals, which naturally reduce LDL cholesterol in the blood and turmeric has antioxidant properties which may prevent LDL oxidation.

More Lifestyle Modifications:

1. Start Exercising: Exercise can improve cholesterol. Moderate physical activity can help raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, the “good” cholesterol. With your doctor’s OK, work up to at least 30 minutes of exercise a day.

Adding more physical activity, even in 10-minute intervals several times a day, can help you begin to lose weight. Just be sure that you can keep up the changes you decide to make. Consider:

Taking a brisk daily walk during your lunch hour

Riding your bike to work

Swimming laps

Playing a favorite sport

To stay motivated, find an exercise buddy or join an exercise group. And remember, any activity is helpful. Even taking the stairs instead of the elevator or doing a few situps while watching television can make a difference.

2. Quit Smoking: If you smoke, stop. Quitting might improve your HDL cholesterol level. And the benefits don’t end there.

Within 20 minutes of quitting, your blood pressure and heart rate decrease. Within one year, your risk of heart disease is half that of a smoker. Within 15 years, your risk of heart disease is similar to someone who never smoked.

3. Lose The Weight: Carrying even a few extra pounds contributes to high cholesterol. Losing as little as 5 to 10 percent of your weight can improve cholesterol levels.

Start by evaluating your eating habits and daily routine. Consider your challenges to weight loss and ways to overcome them.

Small changes add up. If you eat when you’re bored or frustrated, take a walk instead. If you pick up fast food for lunch every day, pack something healthier from home. For snacks, munch on carrot sticks or air-popped popcorn instead of potato chips. Don’t eat mindlessly.

And look for ways to incorporate more activity into your daily routine, such as using the stairs instead of taking the elevator or parking farther from your office.

4. Moderation In Alcohol: Moderate use of alcohol has been linked with higher levels of HDL cholesterol — but the benefits aren’t strong enough to recommend alcohol for anyone who doesn’t already drink. If you drink alcohol, do so in moderation. For healthy adults, that means up to one drink a day for women of all ages and men older than age 65, and up to two drinks a day for men age 65 and younger.

Too much alcohol can lead to serious health problems, including high blood pressure, heart failure and stroke.

Healthy Conclusions

It amazes me how often different diseases can be healed if not reversed by lifestyle changes. It makes perfect sense that having a high cholesterol would also run the risk of a higher blood pressure. Nature has provided many ways for us to care for ourselves without having to always resort to medications. Mind you sometimes medication maybe be needed while the body begins to treat itself through proper nutrition, and natural remedies.

But sad to human nature our problem is ourselves and the society we live in. Why make so many changes, that will not be easy, when I can just take a pill? When I was practicing as a nurse people would ask me, “Well isn’t there a pill I can take?” We have become dependent on pharmaceuticals that we longer want to try a natural approach, especially if that requires effort.

But for those who do, I write every week about different ways that you and I can become healthier by just using what nature has provided. Try it! It is worth the effort to become the healthier version of you!

exercise

Yoga for High Blood Pressure

Eli Ben-Yehuda

Written by Eli Ben-Yehuda

On April 22, 2018

What Is Yoga?

Yoga is a physical, spiritual, and mental discipline that began in India. Since its inception, around the 5th or 6th century BC, yoga has developed into a broad variety of yoga schools. The best known are the Hatha and Rāja yoga schools.

In brief, yoga involves:

  • Gentle physical activity
  • Controlled, focused breathing
  • Meditation
  • Yoga instructors use a variety of terms for various “poses” – often using words from the classical Indian language, Sanskrit. Yoga itself means “union” in Sanskrit.

    Can Yoga Help Lower High Blood Pressure?

    Different schools of yoga vary in their approaches. One branch of yoga is known as Iyengar. This form was recently used in a trial testing its benefits for blood pressure.

    To examine its effects, researchers asked participants with untreated prehypertension or stage 1 hypertension to perform Iyengar exercises over a 12 week period. Blood pressure results were compared with a group of individuals who received “enhanced usual care” – an intervention based on individual dietary adjustments. The authors concluded:

    “Twelve weeks of Iyengar yoga produces clinically meaningful improvements in 24-hour systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure. “

    Debbie Cohen of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, recently published results of the Lifestyle Modification and Blood Pressure Study (LIMBS).

    This is one of the few randomized controlled trials investigating yoga and its impact on blood pressure. It compared 12 weeks of yoga with other standard measures designed to lower blood pressure.

    Published in 2016 in The Journal of Clinical Hypertension, the form of yoga used was Hatha, which means “willful or forceful.”

    The trial compared results across people who were randomized into one of three programs:

    43 people did 12 weeks of yoga – 90-minute classes twice a week, with the gradual introduction of home yoga, guided by DVD.

    48 followed a program of health education and walking – including nutritional classes and motivational guidance, and a gradual increase of the exercise to 180 minutes of weekly walking, or 10,000 daily steps.

    46 people did both the yoga and the healthy living – although people in this group could opt to leave out the home yoga added to the bi-weekly classes.

    All three programs were found to reduce resting blood pressure. For all participants, readings were lower at 12 weeks and 24 weeks than at the start of the study.

    The difference in blood pressure reduction was larger for the yoga groups at 12 weeks than for the group following only the healthy lifestyle. But this improvement did not persist at 24 weeks.

    Although the improvements in blood pressure were small, the authors believe they could be important as even a small reduction in blood pressure has health benefits.

    For example, the paper mentions high-quality research showing that even a systolic blood pressure reading (the ‘top’ number) dropping by 2 mm Hg cuts the risk of dying from heart disease by 7 percent, and the risk of stroke death by 10 percent.

    The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends more research to be done into the blood pressure benefit of lifestyle measures such as yoga, to see if it could delay the need for drug treatment.

    Yoga asanas have been clinically proven method for lowering high blood pressure. For me though most of these positions feel so unnatural. They can be very difficult for me to do. But I did find 5 simple asanas that it would seem everyone can do.

    Watch this week’s video and see how you too can lower your blood pressure naturally.


    exercise

    How to Slow Your Beating Heart: Beans vs. Exercise?

    Eli Ben-Yehuda

    Written by Eli Ben-Yehuda

    On August 9, 2017

    Why should you slow your beating heart? Every ten beats per minute increase is associated with a 10 to 20% increase in the risk of premature death. There seems to be a continuous increase in risk with increasing heart rate, at least for values above a beat a second.
     
    But how should you decrease your resting heart rate? Intense cardio-workout, or beans?
    Yes, beans.
     

     

     

     

    About RESPeRATE – Lower High Blood Pressure Naturally.

    RESPeRATE is the only non-drug, FDA-Cleared device for lowering blood pressure naturally. It is clinically proven, doctor recommended and has no side effects.
     
    RESPeRATE lowers blood pressure by relaxing constricted blood vessels which cause high blood pressure. RESPeRATE does so by harnessing the therapeutic power of slow paced breathing with prolonged exhalation in a way that is virtually impossible to achieve on your own. All you have to do is breathe along with RESPeRATE’s guiding tones.
     
    Learn More…

    exercise

    Reduce Blood Pressure Through Weight Training.

    Eli Ben-Yehuda

    Written by Eli Ben-Yehuda

    On April 26, 2017

    Cardio training reduces blood pressure by 10-15 points. But weight training reduces your blood pressure by 40 points. What do you need to do? Just Start.

     

     

    About RESPeRATE – Lower Blood Pressure Naturally.

    RESPeRATE is the only non-drug, FDA-Cleared device for lowering blood pressure naturally. It is clinically proven, doctor recommended and has no side effects.

     

    RESPeRATE lowers blood pressure by relaxing constricted blood vessels which cause high blood pressure. RESPeRATE does so by harnessing the therapeutic power of slow paced breathing with prolonged exhalation in a way that is virtually impossible to achieve on your own. All you have to do is breathe along with RESPeRATE’s guiding tones.

     

    Learn More…

    exercise

    Hypertension Gym Exercises – Do’s & Don’ts.

    Eli Ben-Yehuda

    Written by Eli Ben-Yehuda

    On March 28, 2017

    If you suffer from high blood pressure, more than likely your healthcare provider will probably tell you that you have to increase your physical activity in order to lower your blood pressure. Sometimes, if your blood pressure is not overly high, increasing the amount you exercise can even help keep it under control without medication.

     

    Physical activity actually increases your blood pressure, but only for the short term. Once you’ve stopped exercising, your blood pressure should return to normal quite quickly. The fitter you become the quicker your levels will drop back down to normal.

     

    The American Heart Association recommends that you get at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise weekly, or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise weekly, or a combination of both each week. In any event aim for at least 30 minutes of aerobic activity most days of the week. And if it’s convenient, the gym can be a great place to make sure this happens.

     

    Hypertension Gym Exercises – Best Workouts

    Aerobic exercise is an excellent form of activity for increasing fitness and lowering blood pressure, so using a treadmill or elliptical trainer is a good option in the gym. Many gyms have aerobic classes. Start by joining a beginner’s level class and build up to the advanced classes when you’ve raised your fitness levels. Yoga and Pilates are two activities that you can safely enjoy at the gym too, since they not only boost general fitness but reduce stress.

     

    Whatever activity you opt for at the gym start slowly. Always remember to warm up before you exercise to prevent injury and cool down afterwards. Build up the intensity of your workouts little by little. Stop exercising if you begin to feel dizzy, out of breath, have pains in your arm or jaw, an irregular heartbeat or excessive fatigue.

     

    Monitor your progress and take regular blood pressure readings using a home BP monitor. This can quickly alert you as to whether your fitness regime is helping to reduce your hypertension. Check blood pressure before exercising and at least one hour afterwards.

     

    Weight training In The Gym.

    It may seem counter-intuitive that lifting weights could improve blood pressure, because blood pressure goes up during the actual weight lifting. This week’s review examines whether a weight training exercise plan can in fact help you.

     

    Resistance training at the gym may not be ideal since it can cause blood pressure to rise sharply, however if you use lower weights of 10 lbs or less weight training can be incorporated. Remember however to:

     

    • Learn the correct techniques for lifting to reduce risk of injury.
    • Don’t hold your breath. Holding your breath while you’re exerting yourself can cause BP to spike.
    • Learn to breathe easily and continuously throughout the training.
    • Lift lighter weights more frequently. Heavier weights put more strain on the body causing a greater rise in BP. Challenge yourself instead by lifting lighter weights and increasing the repetitions.
    • Listen to your body. Stop all activity if you start to feel dizzy or out of breath, or if you experience any chest pain or pressure.

    Research Review.

    In one study 15 men above the age of 46 +8  with high blood pressure participated in a weight training program 3 times a week M-W-F with 1 day of rest in between for 12 weeks.

     

    The study was based on 1 Repetition Maximum (1RM) from earlier testing and the volunteers did 3 sets of 12 reps at 60% of their 1 RM of the following exercises:

     

    • leg curl
    • chest press
    • lat pulldown
    • shoulder press
    • biceps curl
    • triceps extension

    Rest between sets was 1 minute and the exercises were not done in a circuit. All three sets were completed for one exercise before moving on.

     

    The Results.

     

    Does weight training improve blood pressure in middle aged men with high blood pressure?

     

    The answer to that is yes, weight training improves blood pressure. Both systolic and diastolic went down after 12 weeks on the program, 16 and 12 mm Hg, respectively (Figure 2). The decrease was enough to shift the group average from being stage 1 hypertension (150/93) to pre-hypertension (134/81).

     

    If your blood pressure is very high your doctor may want to lower it with medicines to start with before commencing you on an exercise program. In any event seek medical advice before embarking on any gym fitness routine.

     

    If you take regular medication ask whether exercising will make it work differently or change the side-effects. If you take beta blockers to control your high blood pressure they can make it difficult for you to reach your target heart rate (since their job is to slow it down). Even if you don’t reach your target, you will still be getting important cardiovascular benefits.

     

    Further Reading on Exercises & Hypertension

    References used to make this article:

    About RESPeRATE

    How to Lower Blood Pressure Fast & Naturally.

    RESPeRATE is the only non-drug, FDA-Cleared device for lowering blood pressure naturally. It is clinically proven, doctor recommended and has no side effects.

    RESPeRATE lowers blood pressure by relaxing constricted blood vessels which cause high blood pressure. RESPeRATE does so by harnessing the therapeutic power of slow-paced breathing with prolonged exhalation in a way that is virtually impossible to achieve on your own. All you have to do is breathe along with RESPeRATE’s guiding tones.

    • Clinically proven
    • Over 250,000 Customers
    • FDA Cleared
    • No Side Effects
    Get 10 Tips to Lower Blood Pressure.

    You will also receive our bi-weekly RESPeRATE Journal.

    By using this form you agree with the storage and handling of your data by this website.

    exercise

    Swimming to Lower Blood Pressure

    Eli Ben-Yehuda

    Written by Eli Ben-Yehuda

    On March 15, 2017
    The Best Way To Lower Your Blood Pressure

    The best and most effective way to lower high blood pressure naturally is through exercise. Many studies have examined exercises like walking, jogging/running, and bicycling. They found that each of these workouts can lead to a significant reduction in blood pressure. However, not many studies have looked at the impact of swimming or water workouts on blood pressure.

    Now we do know that exercise helps reduce blood pressure, and causes weight loss. So we could surmise that water aerobics could lower your blood pressure. But some studies have suggested that swimming might not be all that effective in reducing resting blood pressure. Partly because the blood pressure of trained swimmers, as a whole, is higher than the blood pressure of other endurance athletes.

    The Study

    A study was done to investigate the effects of a 10-week water aerobic exercise on the resting blood pressure in patients with stage 1 or 2 hypertension referring to Tehran University Clinics.

    Forty men with stage 1 or 2 essential hypertension were assigned to two groups. The intervention group and the control group. Subjects in the intervention group participated in a supervised 10-week water aerobic training program.

    The program consisted of 55 min sessions, 3 days per week on alternate days. While those in the control group were not involved in any regular training program during this period. Blood pressure of the participants was recorded and compared at the beginning and at the end of the study.

    What They Found

    The data suggested that a 10-week course of water aerobic exercises (including swimming training) reduces the systolic and mean arterial blood pressure of the participants by 12 points.

    Based on this study, a 10-week water aerobic exercise has an impressive effect on the resting systolic blood pressure in individuals with hypertension. Exercise as a lifestyle modification can be recommended for all individuals with hypertension. Even small reductions in blood pressure are associated, in long-term, with a reduced risk of cardiovascular diseases.

    If you suffer from hypertension or cardiovascular disease, water workouts are a fun way to exercise your heart. This helps lower high blood pressure naturally. If you don’t have a pool of your own, consider joining your local YMCA or a gym that has an indoor pool.

    Click Here To Read The Full Article

    About RESPeRATE

    How to Lower Blood Pressure Fast & Naturally.

    RESPeRATE is the only non-drug, FDA-Cleared device for lowering blood pressure naturally. It is clinically proven, doctor recommended and has no side effects.

    RESPeRATE lowers blood pressure by relaxing constricted blood vessels which cause high blood pressure. RESPeRATE does so by harnessing the therapeutic power of slow-paced breathing with prolonged exhalation in a way that is virtually impossible to achieve on your own. All you have to do is breathe along with RESPeRATE’s guiding tones.

    • Clinically proven
    • Over 250,000 Customers
    • FDA Cleared
    • No Side Effects
    Get 10 Tips to Lower Blood Pressure.

    You will also receive our bi-weekly RESPeRATE Journal.

    By using this form you agree with the storage and handling of your data by this website.

    exercise

    Gardening Lowers Your Stress & Blood Pressure

    Eli Ben-Yehuda

    Written by Eli Ben-Yehuda

    On January 18, 2017

    There is nothing like walking in a park on a cool spring morning. The sunlight filters through the trees, a breeze passes across your face, and you feel this sense of contentment. All is well. You feel your stress roll of your back as if a massive weight has been removed. That is what being outdoors does for us.

    So it is surprising that many more of us don’t practice gardening at home creating our own piece of paradise. It does not matter if your garden is in the country, or on a high rise rooftop, gardening lowers our stress levels which in turn lowers our blood pressure.

    Gardening lowers stress just by being exposed to nature. For example, being in the sunlight has been shown to raise serotonin levels in our brain. Serotonin is the neurotransmitter in our brain that increases our sense of wellbeing. It also increases our melatonin, the hormone responsible for us getting a great night’s sleep.

    Through deliberate mental focus and meditating on the actions of gardening, we are taking time to set aside our problems for a while. We all know it’s healthy to take a break from our stressors and gardening provides that outlet for a lot of people.

    Finally gardening also helps you connect with your surroundings. If you are gardening alone it can help you reconnect with yourself, while gardening with a spouse allows you quality time to work together. The whole idea is creating a space for yourself and others that is stress free. Myself when I work in the garden the smell of the rich earth in my hands gives a sense of contentment. Especially if your are growing from seeds you sow, the miracle that occurs in the ground from seed to plant still fills me will wonder.

    Click Here To Read The Full Article